Book Pairing: Major Pettigrew’s Last Stand & Chateau de Bel-Air

Major PettigrewMajor Pettigrew’s Last Stand by Helen Simonson. New York: Random House, 2010.

It began with the Churchills – a pair of rifles given to the Major’s father by the Maharishi himself after the Colonel saved the spiritual leader’s wife from a riot during the bloody Indian Partition of 1947. The Major was a mere boy then when his family lived in what is now Pakistan, but the honor associated with these fine guns is still a point of pride for the Major. He has long dreamed of walking the fields with the local aristocracy, the Churchills broken across his arm and ready for the hunt.

On the Colonel’s death bed, the Major and his brother Bernie were each given a Churchill with the understanding that the pair would be reunited upon their deaths and passed on to Roger, the Major’s son and sole heir to the family name. The Major takes such pride in the proper execution of family matters that he often opens his small iron strongbox, spreads out the thick pages of his will and reads over the list of assets and distribution. “It reads like a list of achievements.”

So it is to be expected that on the day of Bernie’s death, a moment that pains the Major with great grief, his thoughts naturally go to the reunion of these guns. They must be cared for – their stocks polished to a sheen, their barrels oiled, their triggers at ready. But there’s a problem – Bernie has left his estate to his wife Marjorie without any mention of the father’s directive, and all she and her daughter – and Roger, too, for that matter – can think of is the money the guns will fetch, especially if sold to an American businessman who is buying his way into the English gentry.

But the Churchills are not the only concern disrupting the Major’s carefully manicured life. He finds himself drawn to the elegant Mrs. Ali – the Pakistani shopkeeper at the local convenience store where he buys his tea and a widow like himself. They share a love of books, especially Kipling, and a familial connection to Pakistan. But therein lays the rub: the locals don’t approve of immigrants (Mrs. Ali was born in Sussex, but never mind), and even the Major wonders whether his growing attraction to her is proper. “They pretend to be English. Some of them were even born here. But under the surface were all these barbaric notions and allegiances to foreign customs.”

Helen Simonson’s witty and touching story blends generational, cultural, class and gender conflicts into a delightful read, especially when these elements collide at the annual golf club costume party.  Wanting to trump last year’s successful ‘Last Days of Pompeii’, the planning committee, composed of every gossip and old bitty in the neighborhood, chooses to blend Bollywood with a reenactment of the Colonel’s famous heroic efforts, complete with the gift of the Churchills.

As might be expected when cultural differences are mixed with great quantities of alcohol, the evening ends in disaster, and Major Pettigrew confronts a dilemma: Should he follow his heart and pursue Mrs. Ali, who was humiliated by the offensive pageantry and struggles with her own family traditions, or accept that the world is, indeed, made up of us and them?

For anyone who has lived in a small community where one’s every action is scrutinized by others, Major Pettigrew’s Last Stand will seem familiar territory. Chocked full of characters – from the twittering next-door neighbor to the crass American to the obnoxious son – the novel has an enjoyable blend of humor, hubris and a happy ending.

My Wine Recommendation

Chateau de Bel-airMajor Pettigrew is a traditionalist, so when he has wine with dinner, it must be a proper claret. To the British, that means a French Burgundy. My recommendation for the Major and Mrs. Ali is the 2015 Chateau de Bel-Air, Lalande-de-Pomerol. It has a seductive floral nose with violets and jasmine and tastes of red fruits and sweet spices. $25

 

Book Pairing: A Piece of the World & Cellardoor Queen Anne’s Lace White

a piece of the worldA Piece of the World – Christina Baker Kline. New York: Harper Collins, 2017.

American art critics fall into two camps regarding Andrew Wyeth: Those who dismiss his work, calling him a mere illustrator, and those who regard him as a virtuoso of modern realism. But both camps agree on one point: “Christina’s World” is his masterpiece.

Even a casual patron of art knows the image: a woman in a pink dress lying in a field, her back to the viewer, facing a bleak house on the horizon across a grassy plain. At first one’s eye is drawn to the painting’s perfect composition – the girl’s dark hair placed dead center on the canvas; the house a weathered gray that blends with the stormy horizon. On closer examination, one looks at the woman’s body – the awkward turn of her torso, her thin arms, the fingers of one hand splayed as if clawing the earth. The viewer then wonders: Who is this woman and what is she thinking as she stares off into the distance? Christina Kline’s book seeks to answer this question.

Based on exhaustive reading of biographies, autobiographies, obituaries, articles, histories and art criticisms, Kline creates a fictionalized story of Christina Olson’s world – a world that traces its roots to Salem, Massachusetts where a female descendent  of John Hawthorne, the notorious chief magistrate of the Salem Witch Trials, marries a Norwegian sailor named Olson. The couple has three sons and one daughter – Christina. Fast forward decades and one of the sons, Al, and his sister Christina still live in the austere nine bedroom house on the bluff when a car arrives and out steps a young Andrew (Andy) Wyeth. He commandeers a room on the third floor of their house in Cushing, Maine and summer after summer travels from his home in Pennsylvania to paint, using eggs from the chickens in the yard to mix his tempera colors.

Soon, a friendship develops among Andy, his wife Betsy, Al and Christina, and as the siblings go about their daily chores managing a house and farm with no running water or electricity, Andy paints them – Al striding across a field, black crows on the barn roof, a pitcher of wild flowers, a rope hanging from a rafter, a dog curled on a white bedspread, and Christina – sitting in a doorway, straight back in a chair, crawling across the field.

This was her life from an early age. She suffered from ‘Charcot-Marie-Tooth syndrome’, a hereditary disorder that damages nerves in the arms and legs. Refusing to use a wheelchair, she crawled upstairs, outside to the chickens, down the road to neighbor’s homes and across the fields to the view from the bluff. Like the New England winters that the summer cottage people escaped, Christina is rock hard. Like the house, like the landscape, she perseveres year after year.

Kline’s story has no room for pity. One admires, even loves, this woman who accepts her condition while fighting not to be defined by it. “We all have our burdens to bear,” her mother told her at an early age. “You know what yours is now. That’s good. You’ll never by surprised by it.”

Where Wyeth’s paintings are stark and drained of color, Kline’s writing is lush. She paints with words of flowers, sunlight on ocean tides and blue skies with pink-tipped clouds, capturing the world as Christina sees it. But in the end, it’s all about the painting. “There she is, that girl, painted on a planet of grass. Her wants are simple: to tilt her face to the sun and feel its warmth. To clutch the earth beneath her fingers. To escape from and return to the house she was born in.”

View the painting. Read the book. Admire the tenacity of the human spirit.

My Wine Recommendation

queen-annes-lace“Live your life. Be who you are. Drink good wine along the way.” That’s the motto of Cellardoor Winery in Lincolnville, Maine. As Christina and Al sit on a blanket outside their house at the end of a hard day on the farm, Cellardoor’s Queen Anne’ Lace wine would be the perfect complement to the evening. Made from a 50/50 blend on Seyval and Vidal grapes, it offers aromas of citrus blossom, green apple, and Key lime pie. When the bottle is empty, it makes a perfect container for a bouquet of wild flowers. $16.

 

Book Pairing: Rules for Lying and Fainting Goat Republic

Anne's coverRules for Lying – Anne Corbitt. Cape Girardeau, MO: Southeast Missouri State University Press. 2016.

The rules seem easy: Keep the details simple. Never underestimate the power of denial. Tell the truth about everything except what you want to hide. Don’t say more than you have to.

But when these rules are enacted by a community of educators, parents and students, what is true and what is false becomes complex. Anne Corbitt’s debut novel speaks to the social and psychological repercussions of lying in a story as current as today’s Twitter feeds. Set in a suburban Atlanta community, sophomore Langley lures boyfriend Kevin to a hidden area in the locker room for some after school personal time. But when custodian Oliver discovers their tryst, Langley claims rape. Complicating the situation is Oliver’s daughter, Eleanor, who (a) told best friend Lindsay about the private spot and (b) has an equally strong crush on Kevin, calling him “first, like the front seat of a car.” Parents are notified; students choose sides; chaos erupts.

One strength of Corbitt’s novel is the way she nails the subtle details of high school – the smells of the hallways, the cafeteria food, the marching band practice, the motivational posters in the counselor’s office. All these details and more pull the reader to a time and place full of hall passes and locker combinations that never seem to change. Set in the late 1990’s, Langley may not be cyberbullied, but the notes pushed under the front door of her home are just as frightening. The same applies to Kevin. He may not own a cellphone with internet connection, but his desire to run from his problems, including a father who believes the worse in him, is just as true for Kevin as any 21st century teen.

Like the ripples that spread when a rock is thrown into water, the he-said / she-said nature of the plot travels outward exposing other lies. Divorced father Oliver secretly spies on his ex who cheated on him with her Yoga instructor. Kevin’s mother Grace still longs for absolution from making a false claim of rape against a college professor. Principal Carter is on the verge of running away with the school counselor. All the kids seem to sneak vodka from their parent’s well-stocked liquor cabinets. As the police investigate, lawyers are retained and the community takes sides. Soon the matter seems no longer an issue of who to believe than how to survive a media onslaught, something public schools never do well.

Rules for Lying is also about change – the way that time shifts perspective on the causes and effects of calamity. “Once a man could point to a problem and say there, that’s it,” ponders Oliver. “But now trouble snuck from any direction . . . Families split open. Men took things that didn’t belong to them. Children slipped their underwear past their knees, and strangers invaded schools with firearms.”

His comment seems bleak, but Corbitt’s book is positive. Each character emerges from their personal crucible stronger, wiser, and better able to face what comes next.

My Wine Recommendation

republicAt the end of a difficult week, both Langley and Kevin’s parents deserve a bracing drink or perhaps a visit to a regional winery. Thankfully, north Georgia has several good ones to choose from. One of my favorites is Fainting Goat near Jasper. The name itself would encourage the parents to laugh at life’s problems as they take in the panoramic mountain views and drink the vineyard’s most popular wine: Fainting Goat Republic. Aged in French oak barrels, this red is produced from Italian grapes and has flavors of blackberry and vanilla. $38.

 

Book Pairing: Tomato Rhapsody & Castello di Meleto Chianti Reserva 2012

tomato rhapsody

Tomato Rhapsody: A Fable of Love, Lust
& Forbidden Fruit

by Adam Schell.
New York: Delacorte Press, 2009.

If ever a fruit was cultivated that pairs well with wine, the tomato is it. Slice it on a sandwich, ladle it on pizza, toss it with pasta, or layer it between mozzarella and basil with a drizzle of olive oil, the tomato simply cries for a glass of vino.

In Tomato Rhapsody, make that a full bottle as the story of the humble tomato is elevated to the height of Bacchus himself. Set in 16th century Tuscany, the story follows the love-at-first-sight meeting between Davido, a young Ebreo (Jewish) farmer who cares for his tomato plants so much he sleeps beside them, and Mari, a beautiful Catholic girl who has an equal passion for growing olives.

“Lush, round, slightly ribbed, a shade of red unmatched in all of nature, with a melding of yellow,” alas, the sexy tomato is considered by good Christians to be the fruit of the devil. Thus, theirs is a forbidden love united by a forbidden fruit.

For the Jewish settlers to remain and flourish in Tuscany, they must educate their neighbors to the tomatoes’ rich goodness. That opportunity comes at the Feast of the Drunken Saint – a festival that, among other things, pits one’s stamina for drinking wine against one’s ability to stay on the back of a donkey . . . with one’s hand tied behind one’s back . . . pummeling one another with the free hand . . . for twelve laps around the town square. All villagers agree it’s the perfect way for Davido to prove his worthiness to Mari.

But as Shakespeare would say, “A happy ending cannot come in the middle of the story,” for like a Shakespearean comedy, the lovers must go through much more agony before reaching the happy every after when they learn, “The truth my heart tells me looms above, that if we choose each other, God will protect us, for God is real and God is love.”

In many ways, Tomato Rhapsody reads like it was written by the Bard. The villagers speak in rhyming couplets, the humor is bawdy, the structure follows a three-act play, and there’s even a fool who delivers asides. Rounding out the cast of villagers is a Padre whose appetite for food surpasses his love of God, an evil stepfather determined not only to sell off his step-daughter to the highest bidder but also take over the fertile farming land owned by the Jews, a ready knave to do his bidding, and a ruling lord who descends from “a long line of inbreeds, half-wits, perverts, pedants, scoundrels, tyrants, sodomites and syphilitics.” (No wonder he wants to become a humble peasant.)

Since the novel is based on the introduction of the tomato to Italian cooking, the author sprinkles the book with recipes such as Mari’s One-Pan Roasted Tomato Sauce with Black Olives and the Good Padre’s Lemony Tomato & Mink Panzanetta Salad.

Family, tradition, religion, love, food, wine. Tomato Rhapsody hits all the right notes for an enjoyable summer read. Buon Appetito!

My Wine Recommendation

castello di meletoOne of the oldest and most esteemed vineyards in Tuscany (established 1256) is Castello di Meleto, and their2012 Chianti Riserva Vigna Casi is the wine to drink. This single-vineyard Riserva has the dark color and dense concentration of flavors you would expect from Chianti, but it also has a soft side that brings notes of cherry, blackberry and spice. Our lovers would approve. The 2012 reached its maturity in 2015 so it can be drunk now. $30.

 

Book Pairings: A Nearly Perfect Copy & Mumm Napa Brut Prestige

 

A Nearly Perfect Copy

A Nearly Perfect Copy
by Allison Amend
New York: Random House, 2013.

Is a lie ever justified? Can deceit lead to happiness?  Allison Amend examines this tangled web in a story set in the art world. Elm works for Tinsley’s, a New York auction house established by her grandfather. She has “the eye” – the ability to see art as if through the eyes of the artist, a “transubstantiation” that seems spiritual as if she hears the art speak. Her area of expertise is seventeenth- through nineteenth- century drawings and prints, which makes her “the go-to person for a New York Times quote, the one who took big clients to dinner, a member of the board of trustees of two museums and the art consultant to a trendy, invited-members-only downtown social club.”

But Elm’s eye has suffered since a 2004 vacation in Thailand when her son was lost in a tsunami. Somehow she managed to make it to the shore with her daughter but her son, Rolan, was never found. Her husband was right beside him. She knows it wasn’t Ian’s fault, after all, some 240,000 were killed, but could he not have saved one little boy?

At an art patron’s home, she meets a couple who loved their Rhodesian Ridgeback so much they’re investigating having him cloned. It’s an audacious idea, but her depression is so great, her grief so deep, that it gets her thinking.

In Paris, Gabriel is the quintessential starving artist. A graduate of a prestigious art school, his gift is his ability to create derivative drawings of masters, especially the Spanish painters of the late 1800’s. He knows how to prime canvasses with gesso, making them so smooth the paint glides. He knows how to mix his own colors – “stark cobalt, aquamarine nearly glowing, or a navy, so dark, as to masquerade as black” – the colors so often used by the artists he emulates. When he takes brush in hand, he channels these painters onto the canvas. Compared to his original art which has been described by teachers as lacking inspiration, voice or spark, these works glitter.

Through his girlfriend, Colette, who also works for Tinsley’s, he receives a proposition from her uncle – create canvasses in the style of the Spanish masters for a client who is furnishing a hotel. Such a simple job; what easy money. Why shouldn’t he finally make his art pay? How could he possibly know that it is destined for a New York auction house?

A careful reader can see where Amend is going with this story. Like Faust, each character makes a deal with the devil. Elm is so deep in deceit that she doesn’t question the art that crosses her desk. If she wants to recreate her son, she needs lots of money for the exclusive French doctors who do the procedure. In contrast, Gabriel simply wants to hold onto his girlfriend, pay his rent and get some respect in the art world. He’s torn, but it’s better than selling canvases beside the Seine.

Amend complicates the plot even further by overlaying Elm and Gabriel’s story with the continuing effort by US and French authorities to reunite art taken by the Nazi’s to the families of the owners. It seems the uncle not only wants to pass off Gabriel’s work as authentic but also to claim it was recovered stolen property. His logic is seductive: “Say you borrow twenty euros from someone. Then you pay them back. Does it have to be the same twenty euros?”

As Elm and Gabriel consider their options, the reader gets an insider’s look into the world or at and art forgery. It’s big business. While the central characters are at times dislikeable, the minor characters fill in the spaces their conscience has skipped. Lying is a web but a seductive one. A Nearly Perfect Copy is not a perfect novel, but it’s close enough for an enjoyable read.

My wine recommendation:

Mumm-BrutPrestige-LG_e3b4Ah, the French aperitif. What a wonderful ritual. Whether shared with friends before a meal or at a book club meeting, my favorite is Kir Royale. In a fluted glass, add crème de Cassis or Chambord liqueur to champagne. Save the Veuve Clicquot Brut Yellow Label for another occasion and choose instead Mumm Napa Brut Prestige. Its fresh apple aromas will balance nicely with the black current of the Cassis and its price will satisfy both your palette and your wallet. Santé! ($22)

 

 

 

Book Pairings: Miss Jane & Muscatine Rose’

Miss-JaneMiss Jane: A Novel
by Brad Watson
New York: W. W. Norton & Company, 2016

Jane Chisolm fears few things. Not snakes or coyotes or screeching owls or cyclones or lightening or God or even her own strangeness. Her entry into the world takes place in central Mississippi in 1915 with the aid of Emmalene, the midwife, and Dr. Thompson, who hitches his wagon to the porch railing just in time to see the crowning head of what he hopes is the last child for the parents. Fifteen minutes later, as he holds a lantern over the crying baby, he sees something that gives him pause. After he is fed a plate of chicken and dumplings, he rides back to his house with a jar of homemade whiskey tucked at his feet as payment for his services and ponders how to help the helpless baby. In the years to come, he becomes Jane’s closest friend and medical advocate. But for now, his thoughts echo the words of the baby’s father: “Good lord. What trouble have we gone and brought into this world now?”

In a novel that is equal parts haunting reality and delicate beauty, Brad Watson tells the story of Miss Jane, born to live a hard scrapple, isolated life due to a rare genital malformation that makes her both incontinent and incapable of conception – conditions that render her a social outcast. Watson modeled the character after his own great-aunt, Mary Ellis “Jane” Clay.

At its heart, Miss Jane is a book about character and how people, when confronted with life’s limitations, either fall under the weight or bear the load and move on.

Jane’s parents are already heavy-hearted before Jane enters their lives. Ida still grieves the loss of her favorite child, William, who died at three. Her grief has turned her into an angry, bitter woman with dark thoughts who, on the night Jane is conceived, only remembers waking “in a rage of silent tears.” Her husband uses work and whiskey to quieten a similar rage in his heart. As a toddler, Jane is basically left to the care of her sister Grace, who at the age of ten, witnessed the birth. Until the child can learn how to care for her own “accidents,” Grace is the one who changes the diapers or allows her sister to run about the property with a bare bum. While at first such an upbringing seems cruel, to Jane it feels like liberation. She loves being in the woods with just the pecking of the birds and forest animals, “the flutter of wings, the occasional skittering of squirrels.” She feels comfortable there, “as if nothing could be unnatural in that place within but apart from the world.”

Later, when she persuades her mother to allow her to attend school, she quickly realizes and accepts that she is different. Her solution is to spend time exclusively on the family farm. She teaches herself to read with books from Dr. Thompson and learns to count by managing the till of her father’s country store. She learns about creation from her observations of the farm animals. Watson describes Jane’s relationship with nature as one might talk about a lover – the soft skins of wild mushrooms, the tight and unopened bud of a flower blossom

By the age of sixteen, she is tired of being alone, which segues to the most loving and tender part of the book – her attraction to Elijah Key who lives on a nearby farm and his mutual attraction to her. Carefully watched over by her father, she attends community dances and learns the pleasure of flirtation. But her joy is short-lived when Dr. Thompson reminds her of how cruel it would be to lead the young man on with no hope of bearing children with him.

Then the crash of ’29 comes. Years pass. Grace moves to town. The farm fails. Ida grieves. Chisolm drinks. Dr. Thompson still tries to find a surgeon who can correct Jane’s condition. Possible suitors come and go. Crows angle over fields; hawks hover for mice; light cold breezes blow; pecans grow in neglected groves. Throughout it all, Jane lives her life – lonesome, yes, but at peace. She learns that life doesn’t require perfection to be lived to its fullest.

“If you get down to it,” Dr. Thompson tells her toward the end of the story as they watch a flock of peacocks in the yard, “You’ve had love. And as I understand it, once you have something like that, you have it forever.”

It is a tender moment between a widower whose own marriage was not filled with love and a woman who knows far more about love than many more experienced in its arts. The scene is a fitting ending to a story that touches the heart from start to finish.

My wine recommendation:

old-south-winery-miss-scarlett-sweet-muscadine-rose-mississippi-usa-10325204While Miss Jane sometimes drank her daddy’s apple brandy, I think she would also find to her liking Old South Winery’s Sweet Scarlett Muscatine Rose. Made from grapes grown in Natchez, MS, the wine is similar in color and sweetness to White Zinfandel and goes great with party foods, desserts or just sipping on the front porch. $10