Book Pairing: Tomato Rhapsody & Castello di Meleto Chianti Reserva 2012

tomato rhapsody

Tomato Rhapsody: A Fable of Love, Lust
& Forbidden Fruit

by Adam Schell.
New York: Delacorte Press, 2009.

If ever a fruit was cultivated that pairs well with wine, the tomato is it. Slice it on a sandwich, ladle it on pizza, toss it with pasta, or layer it between mozzarella and basil with a drizzle of olive oil, the tomato simply cries for a glass of vino.

In Tomato Rhapsody, make that a full bottle as the story of the humble tomato is elevated to the height of Bacchus himself. Set in 16th century Tuscany, the story follows the love-at-first-sight meeting between Davido, a young Ebreo (Jewish) farmer who cares for his tomato plants so much he sleeps beside them, and Mari, a beautiful Catholic girl who has an equal passion for growing olives.

“Lush, round, slightly ribbed, a shade of red unmatched in all of nature, with a melding of yellow,” alas, the sexy tomato is considered by good Christians to be the fruit of the devil. Thus, theirs is a forbidden love united by a forbidden fruit.

For the Jewish settlers to remain and flourish in Tuscany, they must educate their neighbors to the tomatoes’ rich goodness. That opportunity comes at the Feast of the Drunken Saint – a festival that, among other things, pits one’s stamina for drinking wine against one’s ability to stay on the back of a donkey . . . with one’s hand tied behind one’s back . . . pummeling one another with the free hand . . . for twelve laps around the town square. All villagers agree it’s the perfect way for Davido to prove his worthiness to Mari.

But as Shakespeare would say, “A happy ending cannot come in the middle of the story,” for like a Shakespearean comedy, the lovers must go through much more agony before reaching the happy every after when they learn, “The truth my heart tells me looms above, that if we choose each other, God will protect us, for God is real and God is love.”

In many ways, Tomato Rhapsody reads like it was written by the Bard. The villagers speak in rhyming couplets, the humor is bawdy, the structure follows a three-act play, and there’s even a fool who delivers asides. Rounding out the cast of villagers is a Padre whose appetite for food surpasses his love of God, an evil stepfather determined not only to sell off his step-daughter to the highest bidder but also take over the fertile farming land owned by the Jews, a ready knave to do his bidding, and a ruling lord who descends from “a long line of inbreeds, half-wits, perverts, pedants, scoundrels, tyrants, sodomites and syphilitics.” (No wonder he wants to become a humble peasant.)

Since the novel is based on the introduction of the tomato to Italian cooking, the author sprinkles the book with recipes such as Mari’s One-Pan Roasted Tomato Sauce with Black Olives and the Good Padre’s Lemony Tomato & Mink Panzanetta Salad.

Family, tradition, religion, love, food, wine. Tomato Rhapsody hits all the right notes for an enjoyable summer read. Buon Appetito!

My Wine Recommendation

castello di meletoOne of the oldest and most esteemed vineyards in Tuscany (established 1256) is Castello di Meleto, and their2012 Chianti Riserva Vigna Casi is the wine to drink. This single-vineyard Riserva has the dark color and dense concentration of flavors you would expect from Chianti, but it also has a soft side that brings notes of cherry, blackberry and spice. Our lovers would approve. The 2012 reached its maturity in 2015 so it can be drunk now. $30.

 

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